Silent Unionist Majority Sends Proud Eck’s Army Homeward To Think Again

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The people of Scotland  woke up this morning more British than ever, having voted decisively to stay in the Union.

Despite all the hype and hoopla from the separatism campaign, Scotland has rejected the uncertain path of independence for the security of being part of the United Kingdom.

Scotland has managed to shrug off its latest encounter with Brigadoon Fever. Sadly, Alex Salmond and Nicola Sturgeon haven’t disappeared into the mists with the mythical Scottish utopia but their spin and bluster has evaporated into the ether.

Over the last few days we have seen the Yes campaign descend into “See you, Jimmy” levels of jakeyness and yobdom. The true face of Scottish independence has been revealed – and it isn’t pretty. The spotlight of the world’s media has been put on the natz and the cracks started to appear.

The brutal reality is not that Scots are afraid of radical change but that Salmond and his devotees were woefully short on the hard facts and arguments necessary to convince people to change. Sneering at skeptics and shouting over opponents might work occasionally in the odd debate but a watching public needs much more than bully-boy bluster and swagger to be convinced.

The referendum results show Scotland is not convinced. Salmond couldn’t find enough mugs to get him over the finish line first.

I suspect there will be a lot of hurting people this morning in the nationalist camp. Many of them will continue their pointless rage at Westminster and wallow in their futile anti-English prejudice. However, I suspect the more discerning will realise after a while that they were sold shares in another Darien venture by Salmond and co. Their embarrassment in falling for it will be tempered by relief that the boat was cancelled.

I have no doubt many Yes voters were people who just wanted change, not necessarily because they are deeply unhappy with the way things are but simply because a Yes vote looked like a route to something different. These folks might be disappointed but will shrug their shoulders and get on with things again. It may very well be that their legacy is that their vote s will become a catalyst for change across the whole political spectrum, something that is not unwelcome even to ardent Unionists.

However, there are a great many in the Yes camp who are not motivated by any sentimental longings for a better Scotland but by an ugly hatred of the British State. The referendum victory for the Union is all the more pleasing in that it consigns these people to living under the Union Jack for longer.

We Unionists are entitled to a bit of crowing, particularly those of us who have been vilified for our pro-Union stand.

I have a simple message for these people who are motivated by spite and hatred of all things British:

The referendum result is clear. The people of Scotland have spoken and declared for the Union.

It is OUR Scotland you are living in and it is OUR Saltire you are flying.

We are taking both back as of now.

Scotland Forever!

Rule Britannia!

And God save and bless Her Britannic Majesty, Queen Elizabeth.

The Unconvinced And The Unconsulted

If there is anyone reading this who is still undecided in terms of tomorrow’s world-changing referendum, I have a simple message:

Stop kidding yourself.

This late in the day, you are not undecided – you are unconvinced.

And if you are unconvinced, you must vote logically and that logic says NO.

Too much is at stake for you to succumb to Brigadoon Fever. And the road to Brigadoon actually leads to Darien.

Stay sane and vote NO!

Regardless of the outcome, our country will never be the same again. Big changes are required across the UK, no matter what happens on Thursday. As a Unionist, I only hope we in Scotland remain British and can be at the heart of the transformation required in our land.

The alternative is too awful to contemplate.

As I blogged the other day, the ugly face of nationalism has come to the fore. The mask has slipped and we see the vicious hatred of England and the English that masquerades as Scottish patriotism.

The problem is that a Yes win only gives these people licence to go on the rampage while a NO victory will send them apoplectic. Not a great prospect to look forward to either way but we can only hope that a win for the Union will see the plastics in the Yes “movement” slink away.

Am I the only person who thinks the media is slanting towards a vote for separation by doing all these “If Scotland votes Yes” scenarios and then talking as it if was a fait accompli?

I am fed up with all the analysis being based on something which hasn’t been decided yet. It is a blatant attempt to send a subliminal message. In other words, there is nothing subliminal about it.

It is interesting that the one likely scenario is where they don’t go – and that is the scenario where the voters of rUK who feel spurned and betrayed by Scotland wreak a terrible revenge – and tell their politicians that any attempt to share the pound will result in electoral annihilation.

The massed millions in the rest of the UK, denied any say so far in the future of the Union, may yet have the final decisive word on it.

Upward And Onward

As matters off the field go into meltdown, it is a tonic for beleaguered Rangers fans to finally see the team playing some decent football and, more importantly, getting the results.

Last night’s victory over Inverness Caledonian Thistle laid down a marker in terms of Rangers’ progress and their intentions.

Even although Ally McCoist’s team is nowhere near the finished article, the fact is that they need fear no team in Scotland’s top flight.

The win last night came on the back of last Friday’s 4-0 demolition of Raith Rovers in Kirkcaldy, where Rangers played at a zippy pace which was too much for the hosts and managed to score some fine goals as well.

Gers fans were disgruntled with Ally McCoist only a few weeks ago but only the most churlish would deny that he is doing a decent job in steering Rangers in the right direction.

Long may it continue.